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Summer CLE Week XXXIII

May 25 — June 8, 2012

83 CLE credits have been approved, including
3.0 Ethics and 2.0 Bias

CLE credit has been approved as follows:
   - 6.5 Standard credits for each seminar, May 25-June 1,
     June 4-6, and June 8
   - 3.0 Ethics credits (am) & 2.0 Elimination of Bias
     credits (pm) for June 2
   - 2.0 Ethics credits (am) & 4.5 Standard credits for June 7

For more information, email LSCLE@umn.edu, or call 612-625-6674.

SuperPass! Super Programs! Super Savings!
$225 per seminar or use the SuperPass and save! Take up to 7 courses with the SuperPass for only $795! All courses are designed to provide practical information you can use in your practice or thought provoking analysis of issues affecting society.

Parking is available in Lot 86 immediately adjacent to the Law School or local ramps. For directions and campus parking information, click here.

Summer CLE Programs
University of Minnesota Law School
229 - 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Permit 90155

To download the PDF brochure of the program, click here.

 

Friday, May 25, 2012
Hot Topics in the Transition to Cleaner Energy

Professor Hari M. Osofsky
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166003

 

 

Hot Topics in the Transition to Cleaner Energy

This Super CLE will provide an overview of the legal barriers to achieving energy independence and cleaner energy, and then analyze efforts at cross-cutting regulation aimed at overcoming these obstacles to effective policy. It will focus on three critical areas of the energy economy in which such efforts are taking place: offshore energy development, motor vehicle standards, and energy transmission and pricing. With respect to offshore energy, it will consider regulatory efforts to make deepwater drilling safer in the aftermath of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill and to expand offshore renewable energy. Regarding motor vehicles, it will analyze the ongoing partnership among the federal government, automobile manufacturers, and California to develop standards that simultaneously address tailpipe emissions (environmental law) and fuel efficiency (energy law). Finally, regarding energy transmission and pricing, it will examine the regulatory interactions between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and regional transmission organizations, particularly the MISO in the Midwest, that are attempting to bring renewable sources into the market and onto the grid more effectively. The Super CLE will consider the complex legal issues involved with each of these strategies and use them as the basis for analyzing pathways to cleaner energy.

 


 

Saturday, May 26, 2012
Communication and Acting Skills for Lawyers

Professor Nancy Cook
University of Minnesota
Law School

Professor Sonja Parks

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166004

 

Communication and Acting Skills for Lawyers

In the practice of law, how you communicate is often as important as what you communicate. Winning a case is not only about the facts of the case; it is about who delivers those facts most convincingly. This full-day seminar is a comprehensive introduction to specific, professional communication and acting skills designed to enhance the persuasiveness of the attorney both in and out of the courtroom.

Topics that will be covered include:

    Engaging and Persuading an "Audience"
  • Commanding the "Stage"/Personal Magnetism
  • Using & Interpreting Body Language/Non-Verbal "Cues"
  • Using "Props" for Effect
  • Vocal Control and Virtuosity
  • "Upstaging" Opponents
  • Intersections of Character, Roles, and Cultures
  • The Ethics of Dramatic Ploys

Participants will learn about communication strategies and dramatic methods in the performing and literary arts that are transferable to law practice. The seminar will also cover strategies to maximize narrative impact, the ethics of story manipulation and dramatic courtroom tactics, and understanding cross-cultural communication. Participants will have the opportunity to observe and voluntarily practice skills or engage in short role plays.

 


 

Monday, May 28, 2012
Understanding Trademarks, Copyright and Related Areas of Intellectual Property

Professor Daniel J. Gifford
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166005

 

 

Understanding Trademarks, Copyright and Related Areas of Intellectual Property

This course will review developments in trademark, copyright, and related areas of intellectual property. Illustrative of the topics to be covered are:

  • Trademark Protection, Infringement, Dilution, including: impact of Moseley v. V. Secret Catalogue, 537 U.S. 418 (2003); revised federal dilution law; Minnesota Anti-dilution law; and Dastar Corp. v. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp., 539 U.S. 23 (2003) involving the relation of the trademark law to copyright law.
  • Trade Dress, design protection issues.
  • Internet Domain Names and the Anticybersquating Consumer Protection Act.
  • Copyright generally, including its scope and limitations.
  • Fair Use Analysis
  • Moral Rights, incorporated into U.S. law pursuant to the Berne convention.
  • Software Protection under copyright law and its limitations.
  • Contractual Provisions for Copyright Owners under shrinkwrap and similar licenses.
  • Copyright Misuse doctrine and its reach and evolution.
  • The Google Settlement.
  • The Antitrust/Copyright Interface, which has gained widespread attention.
  • The digital challenge to the copyright paradigm.
  • Trade Secrets.
  • Rights of Publicity.

The course will tie recent developments to the basic cores of trademark, copyright, and related laws. The course is designed to provide assistance to practitioners with, and without, prior experience in intellectual property.

 


 

Tuesday, May 29, 2012
Hot Topics in Family Law

Professor Brian Bix
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166007

 

 

Hot Topics in Family Law

This course will look at the most important and most controversial developments in Family Law today. Topics will include Posthumous Reproduction, Same-Sex Marriage and Same-Sex Parenting, Alimony Reform, Open Adoption, Surrogacy, Informal Sperm Donor Agreements, and Premarital and Marital Agreements. The course will focus on national developments, but will also note Minnesota statutory and case-law where appropriate.

 


 

Claire A. Hill

Wednesday, May 30, 2012
Corporate Governance After the Financial Crisis

Professor Claire A. Hill
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166008

 

 

Corporate Governance After the Financial Crisis

This CLE will consider recent developments in law that attempt to deal with the financial crisis. We will consider both Federal law and state corporate law. Topics covered will include shareholder proposals, board monitoring duties, and executive compensation.

 


 

Thursday, May 31, 2012
Selected Topics in Unfair Competition and Business Torts

Professor Thomas F. Cotter
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166010

 

 

Selected Topics in Unfair Competition and Business Torts

This seminar provides an introduction to a body of law that is becoming increasingly important not only within the disciplines of intellectual property, antitrust, media law, and entertainment law, but also to general business and corporate practice as well. Broadly construed, the law of unfair competition encompasses not only the relatively well-known fields of trademark and trade secret law, but also a variety of miscellaneous doctrines with which lawyers and judges often have much less familiarity. Claims arising under these latter doctrines nevertheless are becoming more and more common, either as independent bases for litigation or as additional or pendent claims in IP, antitrust, or commercial litigation. This seminar will focus on some of these latter doctrines, including the law of false advertising and product disparagement at common law, under the federal Lanham Act, the Federal Trade Commission Act, and state 'baby FTC' Acts; the law of tortious interference with contract and with prospective business relations; the right of publicity and related doctrines, including the law of false endorsement; and the ongoing tension between First Amendment and unfair competition law. Participants will come away with a good working knowledge of how these doctrines work and how they are distinct from trademark, antitrust, consumer protection, and other related bodies of law.

 


 

Stephen Meili

Friday, June 1, 2012
Recent Developments in Immigration Law and Policy: Detention, Removal and Asylum

Professor Stephen Meili
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166011

 

 

Recent Developments in Immigration Law and Policy:
Detention, Removal and Asylum

Immigration law has become one of the most rapidly developing and controversial areas of law in the U.S. This program will be divided into three components. The first will cover case law within the past two years on immigration issues that include eligibility for asylum, removability from- and inadmissibility to - the United States, and detention of undocumented persons. The second component will cover recent legislative and administrative developments in the area of immigration law. Topics covered will include updates on immigration statutes enacted in Arizona and Alabama (including the status of court challenges to those laws), the Secure Communities program, and the recently announced policy of prosecutorial discretion with respect to detained non-citizens. This section of the program will also consider some of the Constitutional implications of these policy initiatives. The third component will cover ethical issues particular to immigration law. Some of the issues to be considered here are inquiring into the immigration status of clients, confidentiality in asylum and other proceedings, and dealing with cultural and language differences when practicing in this area.

 


 

Carl M. Warren Laura Thomas

Saturday, June 2, 2012
Carl M. Warren
and Laura Thomas
University of Minnesota Law School

3.0 ethics credits approved; Event # 166012
2.0 bias credits approved; Event # 166014

(a.m.) Ethics:  Living the Rules
(p.m.) Dealing with Differences: Serving Immigrant Communities

 

Morning Session (3 ethics crs):
Ethics:  Living the Rules
Using lecture and interactive analysis of hypotheticals, the presenters and participants will review select ethical rules and explore developments and hot issues in the law of ethics in Minnesota and across the country.  The session will end with discussion regarding the ethical basis for the elimination of bias in the practice of law.    

Afternoon Session (2 bias crs):
Dealing with Differences:  Serving Immigrant Communities
This session will explore how shifting immigrant demographics affect communities, the practice of law, and the administration of justice.  It will highlight the need for lawyers to be aware of the changes that have occurred and their implications.  A panel of representatives from several immigrant communities will inform CLE participants of legal and non-legal issues particular to their communities; cultural differences that may affect an attorney’s ability to provide effective representation; and, how best to serve their communities.

 


 

Edward S. Adams

Monday, June 4, 2012
Accounting and Finance for Lawyers

Professor Edward S. Adams
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166015

 

 

Accounting and Finance for Lawyers

Cash and Accrual Accounting. Materiality. Financial Ratio Analysis. Net Present Value. Discounted Cash Flow Analysis. The Capital Asset Pricing Model. The Efficient Markets Hypothesis. Are you familiar with these terms? Do you understand these concepts? Can you communicate with others using these terms? Do you understand accounting and financial concepts utilized by and central to your clients? Do you believe you might be a more valued attorney to your clients if you did? This course provides you with an overview of accounting and finance from the perspective of the practicing attorney.

Among other things, this course will teach you how to:

  • Understand basic accounting principles;
  • Read an annual report and analyze financial statements;
  • Look beyond mere numbers to gauge the real financial performance and strength of a an entity; and
  • Employ cash flow analysis to value a business or determine the potential financial rewards of an investment opportunity.

 


 

Fionnuala Ni Aolain

Tuesday, June 5, 2012
International Criminal Law

Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166016

 

 

International Criminal Law

This CLE provides an introduction to specialist studies in international criminal law, that is, the body of law regulating individual criminal responsibility under international law. The course covers the history and development of international criminal law and the establishment, jurisdiction and activities of the International Criminal Court, as well as international and internationalized criminal tribunals. In that context, the jurisprudence of various international criminal tribunals, from the Nuremberg Tribunal to the International Criminal Court will be integrated into the materials presented. The course will address the material, mental and contextual elements of the three 'core crimes' - genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The course will address the core principle of complementarity and cooperation in international criminal matters and selected conceptual and institutional critiques of the international criminal justice 'project'.

 


 

Kristin E. Hickman

Wednesday, June 6, 2012
Chevron and Beyond: Administrative Law Review and Update

Professor Kristin E. Hickman
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166018

 

 

Chevron and Beyond: Administrative Law Review and Update

As they focus on statutory and regulatory substance, regulatory lawyers often lose sight of broader administrative law issues that may be relevant in representing clients before federal administrative agencies and subsequently in litigation challenging federal government action. This one-day CLE program offers a brief survey and review of administrative law doctrine as well as a primer on recent U.S. Supreme Court and appellate court decisions concerning administrative law issues.

 


 

Thursday, June 7, 2012
An Update on Securities Litigation and Enforcement after the Financial Crisis, the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 and the STOCK Act of 2012

Professor Richard W. Painter
University of Minnesota
Law School

2.0 ethics credits approved
4.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166021

 

An Update on Securities Litigation and Enforcement after the Financial Crisis, the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 and the STOCK Act of 2012

This CLE Program will examine recent developments in federal and state securities laws from the vantage point of litigation and enforcement. Topics include the large number of insider trading enforcement actions and criminal prosecutions in the past two years based on novel theories of liability, the Stop Insider Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act (STOCK Act) of 2012 which purports to address insider trading on government information, changes in the SEC's settlement policy in securities fraud suits and judicial challenges to SEC consent decrees, enforcement actions and prosecutions for sale of unregistered securities under state and federal law, litigation over securities fraud outside the United States after the Supreme Court's decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank (2010) and the Dodd-Frank extraterritorial enforcement provision, the steady flow of securities fraud suits arising out of the financial crisis, and Ponzi scheme litigation. Participants will review and discuss relevant statutory provisions, portions of Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulations, and important cases.

Two hours in the morning will be devoted to topics related to ethics: the SEC's rules of professional conduct for securities lawyers, fraud suits and enforcement actions against lawyers and case law on the in pari delicto defense to suits brought against lawyers and other professionals in Ponzi schemes and similar situations.

 


 

Friday, June 8, 2012
The Constitution in a Conservative Court

Professor Dale Carpenter
University of Minnesota
Law School

6.5 CLE credits approved
Event # 166023

 

 

The Constitution in a Conservative Court

This CLE will cover Constitutional Law developments in the past 20 plus years. It will survey the major substantive areas (excluding criminal law/procedure and the First Amendment) in constitutional law during the period 1988-present. This would include judicial power, congressional power, executive power (including executive power in wartime), substantive due process, equal protection, and other individual rights. I would essentially use the cases and written materials from last year, with an update on developments since June 2011.


 

2012 Summer CLE Brochure

Download Brochure
(PDF, 1.53 MB)