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Human Rights Center's Marsha Freeman (’76) Helps Taiwan Enhance Human Rights

Human Rights Center's Marsha Freeman (’76) Helps Taiwan Enhance Human Rights

Marsha Freeman (’76), a senior fellow with the Law School's Human Rights Center, was one of six international experts invited to Taiwan in November 2013 to help judges and prosecutors better understand the application of international human rights treaties in its domestic courts.

Prof. Wolf's Research Impacts U.K. Policy on Genomics

Prof. Wolf's Research Impacts U.K. Policy on Genomics

Professor Susan Wolf's work on return of results and incidental findings has made significant new impacts. On March 31, the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council—the major funders of biomedical research in the U.K.—published a new "Framework on the Feedback of Health-Related Findings in Research." Its first citation is to NIH-supported work on these issues led by Wolf. The framework goes on to discuss her project's three-tier approach. This new framework will impact all research supported by the Wellcome Trust and MRC.

Prof. Painter's Testimony on Lawyers' Ethics at Crown Court in London Featured in <i>Financial Times</i>

Prof. Painter's Testimony on Lawyers' Ethics at Crown Court in London Featured in Financial Times

The Financial Times covered a hearing at the Crown Court in London, where Professor Richard Painter testified about professional conduct rules for U.S. attorneys representing clients in connection with foreign proceedings. The hearing followed an unsuccessful corporate bribery prosecution by the U.K. Serious Fraud Office and involved claims by the defendant that the Washington, D.C., law firm Akin Gump should pay part of the costs of defending the prosecution.

Prof. Kirtley Debates Cameras in the Courts on BBC World Service

Prof. Kirtley Debates Cameras in the Courts on BBC World Service

Professor Jane Kirtley was a guest on the BBC World Service show World Have Your Say. The topic was the decision of a high court judge in South Africa to allow electronic media coverage of the Oscar Pistorius murder trial. This is the first time television and radio coverage of a criminal trial has been permitted in South Africa. Kirtley debated the judge's decision with an English criminal defense attorney. (Note that the segment begins about 40 minutes into the program link.)

Prof. Gross Speaks about Drones on WCCO News Radio

Prof. Gross Speaks about Drones on WCCO News Radio

Professor Oren Gross was a guest on WCCO News Radio's The Chad Hartman Show, discussing drones and their use in contemporary warfare. The interview preceded Gross's Feb. 11 Irving Younger Professorship in Law Reappointment Lecture, entitled "The New Way of War: Is There a Duty to Use Drones?"

In Doe v. Nestle, Profs. Green and Ní Aoláin Help Bring Nuremberg Precedent to Contemporary Law

On Dec. 2, 2013, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth District heard an oral argument in the case of Doe v. Nestle, brought on behalf of three children allegedly forced to perform slave labor on cocoa plantations in the Ivory Coast. During the argument, the judges extensively discussed an amicus brief filed by a group of 15 scholars of the post-WWII Nuremberg war crimes tribunals, one of whom is Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin of the Law School. Professor Jennifer Green served as counsel of record on the brief, which argued that the precedents set during the Nuremberg trials regarding corporations' responsibility for criminal acts should be adhered to in Doe v. Nestle as well.

Prof. Meili Delivers Paper at Refugee Resettlement Conference in New Zealand

Prof. Meili Delivers Paper at Refugee Resettlement Conference in New Zealand

Professor Stephen Meili delivered a paper on U.S. refugee resettlement policy at a conference sponsored by the University of Auckland's New Zealand Centre on Human Rights. The theme of the conference was the extent to which the resettlement policies of five countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States) comport with each country's obligations under international human rights law. Meili's presentation covered the U.S. case and argued that while U.S. policy exceeds its treaty obligations in some areas, it falls short of it in others. Meili's research for the conference complements his current research on the impact of human rights treaties on asylum jurisprudence and practice in the same five countries. His research in that area has been sponsored by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Robina Foundation.

Profs. Shaffer and Goodwin Speak in Abu Dhabi on Standard-Setting, International Harmonization and Development

Professors Gregory Shaffer and Michele Goodwin were the keynote speakers on a plenary panel in Abu Dhabi on standard-setting, international harmonization and development on Dec. 16, 2013.

Shaffer has also been elected vice president of the American Society of International Law, the leading international law society in the United States.

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