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Human Rights Law Faculty

The Law School's outstanding faculty includes internationally renown human rights experts, many of whom have practical legal experience in the area. They teach human rights courses on a variety of topics, including international human rights law, American Indian law, civil rights, the death penalty, freedom of expression, and employment discrimination. Experienced clinicians and researchers bring their area of expertise to the large number of clinics offered at the Law School.

Dale Carpenter
Constitutional law and sexual orientation and the law
Richard S. Frase
Comparative criminal procedure
Michele Goodwin
Torts, biotechnology, bioethics, health law, health policy, ethics, human rights, organ trafficking, and social policy
Jennifer Green
International human rights clinic
Oren Gross
National security and humanitarian law
Stephen Meili
Asylum law, immigration and human rights
Fred Morrison
International law and comparative public law
Fionnuala Ní Aoláin
National security, transitional justice, European law, and women's rights
Ruth Okediji
International intellectual property law and policy
Myron Orfield
Civil rights and questions of regional governance
Christopher Roberts
Torts, human rights law, administrative law, social policy, citizenship, law and social science, social theory
Mary Rumsey
Legal research
Gregory Shaffer
International trade law and transnational law
Robert Stein
Rule of law
Carl Warren
Civil rights
David Weissbrodt
International human rights and immigration
David Wippman
International and human rights law and the law of war

Affiliated and Adjunct Human Rights Law Faculty

 

Marsha Freeman
Director of International Women's Rights Action Watch (IWRAW)
Barbara Frey
Human rights
Leigh Payne
Institute for Global Studies
Abdulwahid Qalinle
Islamic law and human rights
Kristi Rudelius-Palmer
Human rights and education
Kathryn A. Sikkink
Human rights

Tatuye Means

"The Human Rights Center and clinical faculty have provided the resources and skills necessary for me to be an indigenous issues advocate—a testament to the Law School's commitment to meeting each student's needs."

- TATUYE MEANS (’10)
  Fellow, Tribal Law and
  Policy Institute