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Conferences

The institute sponsors several conferences a year, usually in connection with ongoing projects or subject matter interests and often in collaboration with other research institutes.

2008

Reconsidering Retributivism

This conference (co-sponsored with the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement, a research institute of the Dutch Science Foundation) was held in Leiden, The Netherlands, in January 2008. Its premise was that prevailing retributive theories of punishment do not provide frameworks and vocabularies for normative analysis of recent criminal justice policy developments such as restorative justice, drug and other problem-solving courts, and coerced participation in treatment programs.

Attendees included a mix of philosophers and penal theorists: Andrew Ashworth (Cambridge), Antony Duff (Stirling), Henk Elffers (NSCR, Leiden) Richard Frase (Minnesota), Doug Husak (Rutgers), John Kleinig (John Jay College, CUNY), Matt Matravers (York), Nicola Lacey (London School of Economics), Peter Ramsay, (London School of Economics), Kevin Reitz (Minnesota), Julian Roberts (Oxford), Andrew von Hirsch (Cambridge), Jan de Keijser (NSCR, Leiden)]. A follow-up conference to discuss revised copies of papers will be held in 2009.

The Collateral Effects of Imprisonment

This conference (co-sponsored with NSCR, a research institute of the Dutch Science Foundation) was held in Leiden, The Netherlands, in January 2008. Its aim was to lay a foundation for development of a comprehensive agenda for a Dutch program of research on collateral effects including former prisoners' subsequent labor force participation, physical and mental health, and family functioning and the effects of individuals' imprisonment on their children, families, and communities.

Background papers were commissioned on labor force participation (Steve Raphael, Berkeley), prisoners' children (Joe Murray, Cambridge), community effects (Todd Clear, CUNY), and mental health (Adrian Grounds, Cambridge). Attendees included, besides the writers, Bert Berghuis (Netherlands Ministry of Justice Research), Stefan Bogaerts (WODC), Freya Dittman-Kohli (Radboud University), Paul Emmelkamp(Amsterdam), Jan Gerris (Radboud University), Beate Volker (Utrecht University). NSCR participants included Catrien Bijleveld, Arjan Blokland, Gerben Bruinsma, Anja Dirkzwager, Jan Fiselier, Paul Nieuwbeerta, and Peter van der Laan.

Criminal Histories

This conference (co-sponsored with the Oxford Centre for Criminology and the Center for Penal Theory and Penal Ethics of Cambridge University) was held in Cambridge in April 2008 to discuss a set of commissioned papers on normative, empirical, and legal dimensions of the use of criminal history factors in making sentencing decisions.

Attendees included Andrew Ashworth (Oxford), Peter Asp (Uppsala), Estella Baker (Sheffield), Chris Bennett (Manchester), Anthony Bottoms (Cambridge), Richard Frase (Minnesota), Lila Kazemian (CUNY), Youngjae Lee (Hofstra), Nicola Padfield (University), Kevin Reitz (Minnesota), Julian Roberts (Oxford), Angela Spriggs (Sheffield), Andrew von Hirsch (Cambridge), and Martin Wasik (Keele). A follow-up meeting to discussed revised and newly commissioned papers will be held in Oxford in spring 2009.

2007

Crime and Justice Editorial Board

A meeting of the editorial board of Crime and Justice: A Review of Research to future volumes was held in Minneapolis in October 2008. The board members are Jean-Paul Brodeur (University of Montréal), Philip Cook (Duke), Robert Crutchfield (University of Washington), Anthony Doob (University of Toronto), Jeffrey Fagan (Columbia), Denise Gottfredson (Maryland), Marie Gottschalk (University of Pennsylvania), James Jacobs (NYU), Tracey Meares (Yale), Terrie Moffit (King's College London), Daniel Nagin (Carnegie Mellon), David Weisburd (George Mason), Franklin E. Zimring (Berkeley). Richard Frase and Barry Feld also attended as did Candace Kruttschnitt and Ross MacMillan of the University of Minnesota Sociology Department.

Crime and Justice in Scandinavia

This conference, organized by the institute with support from the Nordic Council, the Scandinavian Research Council for Criminology, the Swedish National Crime Prevention Council, and the Finnish National Research Institute for Legal Policy, was held in Stockholm in December 2007. Its aim was to take stick of the current state of research and policy concerning crime and criminology in the Scandinavian countries and to plan a volume of essays to summarize the most important developments.

Attendees included a mix of Scandinavian and non-Scandinavian researchers: Jan Andersson (Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention), Jon Gunnar Bernburg (Iceland), Catrien Bijleveld (NSCR/Free University, Amsterdam), Anthony Doob (Toronto), Felipe Estrada (Swedish Nation Council on Crime Prevention), Liv Finstad (University of Oslo), Edward Kleemans (Ministry of Justice, Netherlands), Lars Korsell (Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention), Britta Kyvsgaard (Danish Ministry of Justice), Tapio Lappi-Seppälä (National Research Institute for Legal Policy, Helsinki), Paul Larsson (Norwegian Police University), Jerzy Sarnecki (Stockholm), Annika Snare (Copenhagen), Henrik Tham (Stockholm). The book of essays has been commissioned and a follow-up meeting to discuss initial drafts will be held in Helsinki in May 2009.

2006

Crime and Justice in the Netherlands

This conference, organized by the institute with support from the NSCR and the Dutch Ministry of Justice was held in Leiden in April 2006. Its aim was to discuss initial drafts of essays commissioned after the April 2005 conference.

Attendees included a mix of researchers from the Netherlands and elsewhere: Bert Berghuis (Netherlands Ministry of Justice), Annelies Daalder (Netherlands Ministry of Justice), Jan de Keijser (Leiden), Anthony Doob (Toronto), Max Kommer (Netherlands Ministry of Justice), Erwin Muller (Leiden), Jan Nijboer (Groningen), David J. Smith (Edinburgh/LSE), Arie van der Hurk (Netherlands Ministry of Justice), Peter van Koppen (Leiden), and Franklin E. Zimring (Berkeley). The resulting volume of essays was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2007 as Crime and Justice in the Netherlands, edited by Michael Tonry and Catrien Bijleveld.

For further information, visit http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/page/cj/toc.html.

2005

Crime and Justice in the Netherlands

This conference, organized by the institute with support from the NSCR and the Dutch Ministry of Justice, and the Research Fund of the Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University, was held in Leiden in April 2005. Its aim was to take stock of the current state of research and policy concerning crime and criminology in the Netherlands and to plan a volume of essays to summarize the most important developments.

Attendees included a mix of researchers from the Netherlands and elsewhere: Bert Berghuis (Netherlands Ministry of Justice), Gerben Bruinsma (Leiden), Ybo Buruma (Radboud University), Josine Junger-Tas (Utrecht), Rolf Loeber (Pittsburgh), Jan Nijboer (Groningen), Sonja Snacken (Free University Brussels), Henk van de Bunt (Erasmus University Rotterdam), and René van Swaaningen (Erasmus University Rotterdam). The book of essays was commissioned.

Crime, Punishment, and Politics in Comparative Perspective

This conference, sponsored solely by the institute, discussed drafts of a set of papers commissioned on the changes in penal policies and the reasons for them in various western countries and Japan.

Attendees included a mix of writers and others: David Boerner (Seattle), Ybo Buruma (Nijmegen), Guy Charles (Minnesota), Richard Frase (Minnesota), Neil Hutton (Strathclyde), Joseph Kennedy (U North Carolina), Marc Miller (Arizona), Rod Morgan (Youth Justice Board of England and Wales) , Ian O'Donnell (Dublin), Michael Smith (Wisconsin), Henrik Tham (Stockholm), Dirk von zyl Smit (Universities of Cape Town and Nottingham), and Ron Wright (Wake Forest University). The resulting volume of essays was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2007 as Crime, Punishment, and Politics in Comparative Perspective, edited by Michael Tonry.

For further information, visit http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/page/cj/toc.html.