News Section Header

News

  • Immigration and Human Rights Clinic Helps Ethiopian Professor Secure Asylum

    August 21, 2012 A university professor who fled imprisonment and torture in his native Ethiopia was recently granted asylum in the United States. The Law School’s Immigration and Human Rights Law Clinic represented and guided him through the asylum process.
  • Human Rights Clinic Reports Reflected in U.N. Human Rights Committee Recommendations

    April 18, 2012 University of Minnesota human rights advocates traveled to U.N. headquarters in New York in March 2012 to attend and testify at the 104th session of the U.N. Human Rights Committee.
  • Human Rights Clinic Follows its Brief to Supreme Court

    February 23, 2012 On Feb. 28, 2012, students in the Law School’s Human Rights Litigation and International Legal Advocacy Clinic will be in Washington, D.C., to observe the oral argument before the U.S. Supreme Court in the controversial case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum. Prof. Jennifer Green, who heads the Clinic, is also traveling with her students to watch the oral argument and assist the plaintiffs’ lawyers in responding to media coverage of the case.
  • Erin Furlong ('05)

    Erin Furlong (’05) Describes Benefits of Joint Degree

    November 9, 2011

    In the fall 2011 issue of With Equal Right, Erin Furlong (’05) shares her experiences and the advantages of obtaining a joint J.D. and M.P.H. degree through the Law School’s Joint Degree Program in Law, Health, & the Life Sciences.

  • Immigration and Human Rights Clinic Helps Secure Asylum for Torture Victim

    October 25, 2011 Earlier this month, students and faculty working at the University of Minnesota Law School’s Immigration and Human Rights Clinic helped a West African man, who prefers to remain anonymous, secure asylum in the United States. After being arrested, starved, beaten, tortured, and sexually humiliated by government soldiers for his political beliefs, the man risked his life to escape imprisonment and travel to the United States.
  • A Visit to the Clinic

    October 5, 2011 The Law School’s clinics can make remarkable changes in the lives of their clients, perhaps none more dramatically than the Immigration and Human Rights Law Clinic. The student attorneys in the Immigration Clinic represent refugees who are fleeing persecution in their native countries and seeking asylum in the United States.
  • Ambassador Augustine Mahiga Discusses Rebuilding Somalia at Sept. 24 Forum

    September 22, 2011 The Human Rights Center at the University of Minnesota Law School and the Oslo Center for Peace and Human Rights in partnership with the Somali Institute for Peace Research are co-sponsoring “Rebuilding Somalia: The Role of the Diaspora” on Saturday, September 24, 2011. The forum will be held in Room 25 of Mondale Hall, 229 19th Ave. S., Minneapolis, from 2:00-4:30 p.m.
  • Human Rights Clinic Brief Cited by U.S. Court of Appeals Judges

    March 10, 2011 An amicus curiae brief drafted by the Law School’s Human Rights Litigation and International Legal Advocacy Clinic was cited by two circuit judges in a recent oral argument before the U.S. Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia. Prof. Fionnuala Ní Aoláin signed the brief, which was drafted by Prof. Jennifer Green as Counsel of Record and by student attorneys Astrid Brouillard (‘12), Anne Fuchs (‘12), James C. Horvath (‘12), Melissa Muro Lamere (‘12), Nathaniel Nesbitt (‘11), Feras Sleiman (‘12), and Leo Twiggs (‘11).
  • Safe Future for Client of Immigration and Human Rights Clinic

    September 13, 2010 Students and faculty working at the University of Minnesota’s Immigration and Human Rights Law Clinic have secured asylum for another client fleeing political persecution, the third time in recent months that the Clinic’s efforts have enabled a person fleeing danger abroad to remain in the United States.
  • Another Success for Immigration-Human Rights Clinic

    July 28, 2010 The University of Minnesota Law School’s Immigration and Human Rights Law Clinic has secured safe haven in the United States for a client who fled repeated detention and torture in central Africa in 2003. Government forces in his homeland believed (incorrectly) that the client and his wife supported the political opposition. He was held in a small cell, beaten repeatedly, and deprived of food and sanitary facilities. His wife was beaten, raped, and subjected to electric shocks.

Pages

E.g., Mar 28 2017
E.g., Mar 28 2017

Contact Information

University of Minnesota Law School

Walter F. Mondale Hall | 229 19th Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55455

P: 612-625-1000

Email Us

Connect on Social Media