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Courses & Materials For

Non-Law School students: most course materials require passwords. To access these documents, please note the proper contacts:

  • TWEN: Please contact Michael Hannon mhannon@umn.edu for TWEN access.
  • Course Reserves: Please contact Law Library Circulation/Reserves, lawcirc@umn.edu, for Course Reserves access. Be sure to include your name, your U of M Internet ID, the Law School course in which you are enrolled, and your instructor’s name. We will verify your enrollment prior to providing access.

To access materials for a course, seminar, or clinic in which you are enrolled:

  1. Click on the title of the course, seminar or clinic to reveal additional details.
  2. If there are course materials available, you will see a link for “Course Reserves.” Click on that link to access materials for that course. A list of materials will appear, but individual documents are visible only to those enrolled in the course.
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*Individual course materials are available only to students currently enrolled in that course.*

Note: Some faculty members do not make their course materials available here. They may have a course TWEN site that contains course materials.

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1L

Civil Procedure II #6015

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    This section is reserved for 1L students.

Corporations #6012

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    This course covers basic rules regulating the creation and operation of corporations. It covers such matters as corporation organization; the distribution of powers among the corporate board of directors, its officers, and its stockholders; the proxy system; control devices in the close corporation; and the fiduciary duties of directors, officers and controlling shareholders. This is a course for first year students only; it differs from the upper-level Business Association/Corporation (BA/Corps) course in that it does not cover the law of multi-person unincorporated business organizations. That law is covered in more detail in the Unincorporated Business Associations course. There will be two, graded class partner exercises during the semester (whereby you must work with a partner in the class of your choice and which will account for a total of 30% of your grade) and an open book, in-class final examination (which must be done individually and which will account for 60% of your grade). Individual class participation will also be evaluated (10% of your grade).

Legal Research and Writing #6003

  • Professor Brad Clary
Full course & section details
  • Details:
    Legal Research and Writing - All Sections

Perspectives 1L #6010

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    This course, open to both first-year and upper-year students, is team-taught by faculty who approach the study of law and legal processes from three different disciplinary perspectives. The disciplines presented will vary from year to year. For Spring 2014, the three perspectives will be comparative law, law and economics, and empirically-oriented law and social science. Each faculty member will introduce students to the methodological approach of his or her field. The course will focus on topics drawn from and building on the first-year curriculum, with each faculty member leading discussions on each of the two topics from the perspective of his or her discipline. The topics presented will vary from year to year. The topics for 2014 will be (1) criminal sentencing and (2) judicial ideology. The purpose of the course is to help students appreciate the complexity of the law through the study of legal rules and practices from competing and complementary perspectives and to help students better understand the connections among theory, legal rulemaking, and legal practices. The course grade will be based on three written assignments, one for each perspective covered in the course, each of which will be due as the relevant section of the course is completed. A preliminary version of this year’s syllabus can be found at http://umn.edu/~kritzer/Perspectives-Syllabus-2014.pdf. Note that the syllabus is still preliminary and is subject to change.
  • URL: Course Reserves

Statutory Interpretation #6003

  • Professor Carol Chomsky,
  • Professor Jessica Clarke,
  • Professor Kristin Hickman,
  • Professor Brett McDonnell,
  • Professor Fres Morrison

Clinics

Bankruptcy #7092

  • Adjunct Professor James Brand,
  • Adjunct Professor Clinton Cutler

Business Law #7860

  • Adjunct Professor David F Fisher

Civil Rights Enforcement #6117

  • Professor Gregory Brooker,
  • Professor Erika Mozangue,
  • Professor Bahram Samie,
  • Professor Ana Voss

Detainee Rights #7844

  • Professor Linus Chan,
  • Professor Meghan Heesch

Housing Law #7246

  • Adjunct Professor Drew Schaffer,
  • Adjunct Professor Dorinda Wider

Indian Child Welfare #7098

Workers' Rights #7015

  • Professor Douglas Micko,
  • Professor Ellen Smart

Seminars

Agriculture & the Environment Seminar #6709

  • Adjunct Professor Stephen Carpenter,
  • Adjunct Professor David Minge

China Law #6890

  • Adjunct Professor Chang Wang

Contract Drafting #6837

  • Adjunct Professor Jeffrey Harrington

Contract Drafting #6837

  • Adjunct Professor Niel Willardson

E-Discovery #6714

  • Adjunct Professor Chad Blumenfield,
  • Adjunct Professor Brian Clark

Genetics and Assisted Reproduction: Law and Ethics #6824

  • Adjunct Professor Leili Fatehi,
  • Adjunct Professor Brian G Van Ness

Humphrey Law Seminar #6017

  • Adjunct Professor Kristi Rudelius-Palmer,
  • Professor David Weissbrodt

Law, Health and the Life Sciences #6875

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    Effective Fall 2013 this class is offered Fall and Spring for .5 credits each semester. The class meets approximately every-other week.

National Security Cases in Federal Court #6711

  • Adjunct Professor John Docherty
Full course & section details
  • Details:
    The objective of this two credit seminar is to use structured readings, class discussions, and student presentations to give its participants a thorough grounding in the unique investigative and legal tools that are used in the investigation and trial of a criminal national security case in federal district court. After analyzing the main statutes in the field, such as material support to a foreign terrorist organization, topics covered will include the use of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act as an investigative tool; the extraterritorial application of U.S. criminal laws, and the legal structure applicable to U.S. law enforcement agents when they are working outside the United States; the challenges posed by the existence of classified information that may be relevant to a criminal case and whether the Classified Information Procedures Act adequately remedies those challenges; the choice between military commissions and federal criminal trials for terrorism defendants; and a critical examination of the various legal rationalizations that have been advanced for the detention of terrorism suspects. Class participation is important to a thorough and educational examination of these issues. Students’ grades will be based one-third on class participation, and two-thirds on the writing of a paper, approximately twenty pages long, and that paper’s presentation and defense to their fellow seminar participants. Topics for the paper/presentation can be of the students’ choosing (with the instructor’s approval), or can be selected from a list to be provided by the instructor. Participants in the seminar must either have completed Criminal Procedure or be willing to read, before the first seminar session, a set of readings chosen by the instructor on the topics of search and seizure, the Fourth Amendment’s warrant clause and its exceptions, and the exclusionary rule.

2L/3L

Advanced Trial Practice #6628

  • Adjunct Professor Paul Engh,
  • Adjunct Professor Jon Hopeman

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) #6833

  • Professor Stephen Befort,
  • Adjunct Professor Carolyn Chalmers

Antitrust #6207

  • Adjunct Professor Michael Lindsay,
  • Adjunct Professor Matthew Ralph

Environmental Moot Court #7035

  • (no instructors listed)
Full course & section details

Immigration Law #6872

Insurance #6214

  • Adjunct Professor Margaret Brownell,
  • Adjunct Professor Gary Haugen

International Tax #6627

  • Adjunct Professor Kenneth Levinson,
  • Adjunct Professor Chad Pearson

Judicial Externship #6057

  • Professor Carol Chomsky
Full course & section details
  • Details:
    2-3 credits

Labor Law #6203

  • Adjunct Professor Brendan Cummins,
  • Adjunct Professor Justin Cummins

Legal Scholarship for Equal Justice (LSEJ) #6904

  • (no instructors listed)
Full course & section details
  • Details:
    There will be 4 seats available for U of MN students in Spring 2014. The instructor is Prof. Diane Marie Dube.

Mergers and Acquisitions #6102

  • Adjunct Professor McBroom
Full course & section details
  • Details:
    This course will delve into the substantive work of practitioners in an M&A transaction. Students will gain knowledge of common M&A terms, the main deal documents and material negotiating points surrounding an M&A transaction. We will discuss transaction structures and types of acquirers, valuation concepts and drafting techniques, private equity M&A and leveraged buy-outs, introductory public company M&A concepts and material topics related to venture financings. We will also discuss recent and ongoing transactions. The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the main issues facing practitioners through every phase of an M&A deal and deal documentation from inception to closing.
  • URL: Course Reserves

Museums, Conflict and Law #6127

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    Students can register for 2 or 3 credits depending on Rome participation.

Perspectives #6040

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    This course, open to both first-year and upper-year students, is team-taught by faculty who approach the study of law and legal processes from three different disciplinary perspectives. The disciplines presented will vary from year to year. For Spring 2014, the three perspectives will be comparative law, law and economics, and empirically-oriented law and social science. Each faculty member will introduce students to the methodological approach of his or her field. The course will focus on topics drawn from and building on the first-year curriculum, with each faculty member leading discussions on each of the two topics from the perspective of his or her discipline. The topics presented will vary from year to year. The topics for 2014 will be (1) criminal sentencing and (2) judicial ideology. The purpose of the course is to help students appreciate the complexity of the law through the study of legal rules and practices from competing and complementary perspectives and to help students better understand the connections among theory, legal rulemaking, and legal practices. The course grade will be based on three written assignments, one for each perspective covered in the course, each of which will be due as the relevant section of the course is completed. A preliminary version of this year’s syllabus can be found at http://umn.edu/~kritzer/Perspectives-Syllabus-2014.pdf. Note that the syllabus is still preliminary and is subject to change.
  • URL: Course Reserves

Pretrial Skills #6116

  • Adjunct Professor Daniel Gustafson

Privacy #6103

Full course & section details
  • Details:
    Every single day, the newspaper contains stories – plural intended – about data privacy and security. Whether they concern the National Security Agency, Facebook, or a data breach at a small business, the handling of personal information has become a central concern of our time. In response, a complex law of data privacy has emerged, and now it is a fast growing area of legal practice. This course will equip students to counsel clients about an array of federal, state, and international legal requirements – while also analyzing them critically and thinking about the societal challenges posed by new information technology. Assessment will include group projects and a take-home final.

Sales #6052

  • Adjunct Professor Helen Winder

Trial Practice #6618

  • Adjunct Professor Andrew Dunne,
  • Adjunct Professor Fred Karasov

Trial Practice #6618

  • Adjunct Professor Steven Shumaker,
  • Adjunct Professor Steven Wells

Winning Patent Litigation #6225

  • Adjunct Professor Ted Budd,
  • Adjunct Professor Liz CowanWright,
  • Adjunct Professor Tim Grimsrud,
  • Adjunct Professor David Gross