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The Campaign For The University of Minnesota Law School

Ways to Give

The Law School’s fundraising efforts are coordinated with the University of Minnesota Foundation, which manages gift and endowment accounts for academic and other units that are beneficiaries throughout the University of Minnesota. The Foundation also provides gift receipts to our donors.

Click here to download a gift form.

By Check
By Credit Card
Gifts of Stock or Other Securities
Wire Transfer
Gifts in Kind


By check

Checks should be made payable to the University of Minnesota Foundation, with a note indicating the Law School as the gift designation, and mailed to:

University of Minnesota Foundation
C-M 3854
P.O. Box 70870
St. Paul, MN 55170-3854
Telephone: 612-624-3333 or 800-775-2187
Fax: 612-625-4305

By credit card

Credit card gifts are accepted through the University of Minnesota Foundation. You may either call the credit card hotline at 612-626-8560 or visit the Foundation's Web site at www.giving.umn.edu/law.

Gifts of stock and other securities

Making a gift of appreciated stock and other securities is easy. The University of Minnesota Foundation has accounts with most major brokerage firms, so a transfer can be as simple as a phone call and a written confirmation. For tax purposes, your gift is considered complete on the day that you turn over control of the securities. The value of the gift is its fair market value on that day, and you pay no tax on the capital gains. If the securities are traded daily on a recognized exchange, the value is the average between the high and low prices for that day.

If the stock or securities are held by your bank or broker:

  1. Inform your broker that you want to transfer shares to the Foundation, as a designated gift for the University of Minnesota Law School. Be clear if you want the gift made before the end of the calendar year.
  2. Instruct your broker to contact the Foundation for transfer instructions:

    RBC Wealth Management
    Account #30875055
    DTC #0235
    ATTENTION: Hal Tearse (612-371-2891)
    60 S 6th St., 11th Floor
    Minneapolis, MN 55402

  3. Send a letter to the Foundation indicating if your gift is unrestricted or designated for a specific purpose; b) the estimated amount of the gift, and; c) your broker’s contact information.
  4. You may also use the Foundation's online securities tool at www.giving.umn.edu/securities that allows you to notify the Foundation when you have transferred or plan to transfer stocks.

If you have physical possession of the stock certificates:

  1. Send the unendorsed certificates by certified mail or hand deliver them to the Foundation at the above address.
  2. In a separate envelope, send a signed stock power certificate to the same address, making sure the signature is exactly as it appears on the stock certificate. (Stock power certificates can be obtained from a broker or from the Foundation.)
  3. Send a letter to the Foundation indicating: a) if your gift is unrestricted or designated for a specific purpose.

If you have mutual fund shares:

  1. Contact Accounting Services to determine if the Foundation has an account at your mutual fund company. If the answer is yes, request the account number.
  2. Contact the customer service department at your mutual fund company, provide it with the Foundation’s account number, and request instructions or forms to transfer your asset to the Foundation’s account.
  3. Send a letter to the Foundation indicating if your gift is unrestricted or designated for a specific purpose; b) the estimated amount of the gift, and; c) the name of the mutual fund. Mutual fund transfers usually take a much longer time than securities, so plan your gift well in advance of the date you wish to make the transfer.

Wire transfers

For instructions on wiring cash to the University of Minnesota Foundation, please contact Heidi Jung at 612-624-4888 or hinge001@umn.edu

Gifts in kind

The Law School can accept valuable art or museum objects, books, historical documents, manuscripts, equipment and other gifts of this kind. Some of these possessions otherwise may be subject to an estate tax upon the death of the owner. If you donate such valuable objects, you may claim a charitable income tax deduction and you will know that your gifts will be treated with care and protected by Law School scholars and specialists.