• Child Advocacy and Juvenile Justice Clinic – 7675

Credits

4F/3S

Prerequisites

Recommend:
LAW 6219 Evidence and LAW 6226 Juvenile Justice

Grad. Requirements

Experiential Learning

Subject Area

Civil Litigation *
Criminal Justice *
Family Law *
Litigation, Alternative Dispute Resolution & Advocacy
Public Law
  • Student Year
    Upper Division
    Grade base
    A - F
    Course type
    Clinic

The Child Advocacy and Juvenile Justice Clinic (the “CAC”) is a full academic year, seven credit program beginning in the fall semester in which students represent indigent clients in juvenile delinquency and child welfare matters before the Hennepin County Juvenile Court and custody cases before the Hennepin County Family Court.   Over the last two years, students have been actively involved in two cutting edge areas of the law: they have represented adults seeking custody of unaccompanied immigrant minors under the Special Immigrant Justice Status federal statute, and they have represented two inmates serving life without parole (LWOP) in Minnesota prisons for offenses they committed as juveniles.  In connection with their LWOP cases, students have represented clients in extensive proceedings before state and federal courts, including the District of Minnesota and the Eighth Circuit, and are currently preparing for two extensive resentencing hearings that will take place during the 2016-17 school years.

CAC students represent multiple clients during the course of the year and, under the supervision of CAC faculty, undertake every aspect of direct representation:  from interviewing witnesses, to performing fact investigation, to drafting pleadings, to engaging in settlement negotiations, to appearing for court hearings, to conducting trials. 

Many classroom sessions are held in conjunction with the Indian Child Welfare Clinic and cover not only applicable procedure, substantive law and relevant trial skills, but also address broader systemic issues.  Students are consistently challenged to consider the historical context and purpose of the family and juvenile courts and to think critically about the effectiveness and equity of the present-day system.  

To ensure a fulfilling experience in the CAC, students must be willing to make a substantial time commitment that goes beyond the classroom work.  This may require students to arrange their class schedules in a way that allows students to appear in court, conduct investigations, and meet with clients.  We also strongly recommend that students enroll in Evidence.

Enrollment is limited to eight (8) students.

Contact Information

University of Minnesota Law School

Walter F. Mondale Hall | 229 19th Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55455

P: 612-625-1000

Email Us

Connect on Social Media